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The Worst Excuse You’ve Ever Heard For Leaking Documents – Dirty Cop Leaks Cohen Bank Records Because They Were Missing

The Office of The Inspector General launched yet another probe yesterday and this time it’s aimed at a dirty cop (law enforcement official) who stepped up to take credit for giving Trump’s attorney Michael Cohen’s bank records to equally dirty attorney Michael Avenatti.  With all this dirty being thrown everywhere, sooner or later you just know some of it’s going to stick, and it looks like it may not be just Donald Trump’s personal attorney that it sticks to.

According to the New York Post; the official had grown alarmed after being unable to find two important reports on Cohen’s financial activity in a government database. The official, worried that the information was being withheld from law enforcement, so he released them to Stormy Daniels’s attorney, Michael Avenatti.

In an interview with the New Yorker the “Law Enforcement Official” tries to explain why he did it but it gets a little murky considering his excuse was that he felt someone was trying to keep some of the documents hidden because they were missing;

Excerpt NY: The official, who has spent a career in law enforcement, told me, “I have never seen something pulled off the system. . . . That system is a safeguard for the bank. It’s a stockpile of information. When something’s not there that should be, I immediately became concerned.” The official added, “That’s why I came forward.”

So this “Official” instead of doing the right thing and alerting another “Official” that a couple of documents were missing from the report – decides to commit a crime and just hand them over to Michael Avenatti, one of the sleaziest attorneys on the planet?

SARs are not for public information and covered by the Bank Secrecy Act.  Releasing them is a crime.

The New Yorker reported In the days since [Cohen bank record leak], there has been much speculation about who leaked the confidential documents, and the Treasury Department’s inspector general has launched a probe to find the source. That source, a law-enforcement official, is speaking publicly for the first time, to The New Yorker, to explain the motivation: the official had grown alarmed after being unable to find two important reports on Cohen’s financial activity in a government database. The official, worried that the information was being withheld from law enforcement, released the remaining documents.The payments to Cohen that have emerged in the past week come primarily from a single document, a “suspicious-activity report” filed by First Republic Bank, where Cohen’s shell company, Essential Consultants, L.L.C., maintained an account. The document detailed sums in the hundreds of thousands of dollars paid to Cohen by the pharmaceutical company Novartis, the telecommunications giant A.T. & T., and an investment firm with ties to the Russian oligarch Viktor Vekselberg.The report also refers to two previous suspicious-activity reports, or sars, that the bank had filed, which documented even larger flows of questionable money into Cohen’s account. Those two reports detail more than three million dollars in additional transactions—triple the amount in the report released last week. Which individuals or corporations were involved remains a mystery. But, according to the official who leaked the report, these sars were absent from the database maintained by the Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, or fincen. The official, who has spent a career in law enforcement, told me, “I have never seen something pulled off the system. . . . That system is a safeguard for the bank. It’s a stockpile of information. When something’s not there that should be, I immediately became concerned.” The official added, “That’s why I came forward.”Read the full report by Ronan Farrow of The New Yorker here.Trial lawyer Robert Barnes weighed in with his prediction:


Robert Barnes@Barnes_Law
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